The present lot is exemplary of the hyper-realistic urban landscapes for which Richard Estes is best known. The monumental work measures roughly 3 feet by 6 feet and is the largest print by the artist. To arrive at the completed work, Estes created a maquette and worked closely with Edition Domberger throughout the printing process. In the end, the lifelike work eerily void of human presence, was created using 212 colors and more than 100 layers of ink.

Richard Estes working on D-Train in 1987. Image via Edition Domberger

Usually it's a pretty calculated, sustained, and slow process by which you develop something. The effect can be one of spontaneity, but that's part of the artistry.

Richard Estes

Richard Estes b. 1932

Considered one of the foremost Photorealist painters, the work of Richard Estes is greatly inspired by the paintings of Edgar Degas, Edward Hopper and Thomas Eakins. Despite their looser brush work, Estes' 1960s works featuring city life and people engaged in everyday activities laid the groundwork for extremely refined, masterfully detailed paintings of windowed storefronts and unassuming urban settings with an almost dreamlike atmosphere. Estes was born in Kewanee, Illinois in 1932, and raised in Chicago. He attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago from 1952-1956, and moved to New York soon after. He worked as a graphic designer for a number of magazines and advertising agencies until 1966. Estes is the recipient of a National Council for the Arts fellowship and is a member of the National Academy of Design. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, among others. He lives in New York and Maine.