Niessing Jewelry

Founded in 1873 by Hermann Niessing near the Dutch border in Vreden, Germany, Niessing proudly combines handcraft techniques with contemporary technologies in jewelry making. Embracing Bauhaus principles such as, merging craft and art, true materials, and simplicity and minimalism, Niessing first made a name crafting wedding bands. With technological finesse they formed a continuous circle without a seam to express never ending commitment and love.

Their most well-known design, the award-winning and patented “Niessing Spannring” features a circle of precious metal that holds a floating diamond by perfect tension. And the ingenuity of Niessing doesn’t stop here; in 1986, Niessing invented the “coil” to bring a more modern and simple design to pendant necklaces.

Working with precious metals, is at the heart of Niessing, where they create their own alloys of various colored gold and now silver. The combination of new technologies and delicate hand-forging sets Niessing apart and the Pythagoras jewelry is exemplary of this integration. Niessing flower discs are created in various sizes and metals, with a variety of hand-forged textures. Elegant, yet playful, the flowers can be worn together or separately, as a necklace or a brooch, providing the wearer multiple possibilities.  

Niessing jewelry remains rare to auction, a true testament to its lasting relevance from good design.

The one thing that is absolutely unthinkable to us is mass production.

The Dina Wind Collection

Sold to benefit the Dina Wind Art Foundation

Dina Wind was a global citizen and artist. Born and raised in Israel, she moved to the United States in 1963 with her husband Jerry, settling in Philadelphia. There she raised her family while studying at the University of Pennsylvania, the Barnes Foundation, and with Philadelphia artists Sam Feinstein, Tom Gaughan, and Leon Sitarchuk. Simultaneously, she began her own studio art practice, first in painting and then welded metal sculpture. She became best known as a fearless lady welder at a time when this was quite unusual. Her work is in the permanent collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania Academyof Fine Arts, Woodmere Museum of Art, Grounds for Sculpture, WestCollection, Tel Aviv Museum and more.

Dina Wind, Untitled (Coral Diving), 1970
Dina welding in her studio, 1986

Dina Wind, Spring & Triangle, 2016 at the Woodmere Museum

She was a passionate advocate for the arts, sitting on many boards and believing in the “Power of Art” to help improve individuallives and society at large. With Jerry, Dina traveled the world, studying, appreciating,and collecting art and jewelry everywhere they went. Her personal style was always an extension of her creative spirit, and she wore her jewelry with confidence, mixing bold abstract pieces with family heirlooms. 

Dina passed away in 2014 from ovarian cancer, still young and vibrant at 76. In her memory, her family has created The DinaWind Art Foundation to continue her philanthropy and expand her artistic legacy.

The Dina Wind Art Foundation supports living artists and arts education, sharing the rich story of artist Dina Wind, ensuring her legacy, and promoting her art to inform and impact artists. As a female champion in a predominantly male world, she was an early advocate of creating work withan environmental message and was an outspoken supporter of social justice. The Dina Wind Art Foundation is inspiring tomorrow’s generation of art lovers and practitioners who are committed to making a difference