Layered Modernism

Property from the Collection of Russell Groves

Born in a remote town in Nova Scotia and raised in the New York City area, Russell Groves earned a degree in architecture from the Rhode Island School of Design before embarking on a career in interior design. The curriculum at RISD encompassed fashion design, filmmaking, cultural history and classical literature, providing him with insight into diverse design disciplines. Prior to founding his eponymous firm in the early 1990s, he worked for several well-respected architects including Richard Meier and Peter Marino. His exposure to the landscapes of Nova Scotia and the skyline of New York, combined with his rigorous and varied educational background, led him to his unique design approach: “a reverence for nature and materiality balanced by a highly sophisticated sensibility.” We are delighted to offer property from Groves' sleek, glamorous, urban Chelsea apartment and his chic, earthy, cedar-shingled home in East Hampton. Taken together, these two domiciles and their interiors represent every facet of his personal style.

I’d describe the aesthetic that guides me as “layered modernism”, something both sybaritic and meticulous — a sober luxury.

Russell Groves

Interiors by Russell Groves

Angelo Mangiarotti 1921–2012

Italian architect and designer Angelo Mangiarotti was known for applying a personal and humanistic approach to functional design. Born in Milan in 1921, he earned a degree in architecture from Milan Politecnico in 1948. Mangiarotti was fascinated by the methods and techniques employed in city-planning and architecture in addition to a passion for beauty and design. In 1953, while serving as a guest lecturer at the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago he made connections to Mies van der Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Walter Gropius.

Mangiarotti returned to Italy in 1955 establishing a firm with Bruno Morasutti, later opening his own firm in 1960. His inventive nature and craftsmanship was employed in numerous projects from marble bowls and glass collections for Knoll to urban planning and industrial design projects. In 1989, he established the Mangiarotti & Associates Office based in Tokyo, Japan. A highly regarded designer, Mangiarotti was presented with the Domus Formica award in 1956, the American Industrial Partners award for industrial construction works in 1972, the gold medal in architecture by the Accademia della Torre of Carrara in 1998, and a dedicated exhibition held at Calenzano's Design Museum in May 2010. Angelo Mangiarotti died in Milan in 2012.

Auction Results Angelo Mangiarotti