Layered Modernism

Property from the Collection of Russell Groves

Born in a remote town in Nova Scotia and raised in the New York City area, Russell Groves earned a degree in architecture from the Rhode Island School of Design before embarking on a career in interior design. The curriculum at RISD encompassed fashion design, filmmaking, cultural history and classical literature, providing him with insight into diverse design disciplines. Prior to founding his eponymous firm in the early 1990s, he worked for several well-respected architects including Richard Meier and Peter Marino. His exposure to the landscapes of Nova Scotia and the skyline of New York, combined with his rigorous and varied educational background, led him to his unique design approach: “a reverence for nature and materiality balanced by a highly sophisticated sensibility.” We are delighted to offer property from Groves' sleek, glamorous, urban Chelsea apartment and his chic, earthy, cedar-shingled home in East Hampton. Taken together, these two domiciles and their interiors represent every facet of his personal style.

I’d describe the aesthetic that guides me as “layered modernism”, something both sybaritic and meticulous — a sober luxury.

Russell Groves

Interiors by Russell Groves

Marcel Breuer 1902–1981

Marcel Breuer’s parents encouraged their children to take interest in culture and the arts from an early age, and when the Hungarian born designer turned eighteen he secured a scholarship to the prestigious Fine Arts Academy in Vienna. Uninterested in the lengthy discussions about aesthetic tradition and eager for a more practical education, he took a job in an architectural firm. When a friend told him about a new art school in Weimar Germany called the Bauhaus, Breuer promptly enrolled. Under the guidance of director Walter Gropius, Breuer became one of six apprentices to join the furniture workshop, producing his earliest known design in 1921, the African Chair. Breuer graduated in 1924 and after a brief time in Paris, returned to the school as the head of the of the carpentry worship in 1925. Inspired by his first bicycle, Breuer began working on designs for a chair made of tubular steel. The revolutionary steel club armchair, known as the Wassily, remains one of his most well-known designs to date.

Auction Results Marcel Breuer